FAQ

Q: LORE? What on earth is roller skating LORE???
A: Go here to learn your Roller Skating LORE!
 
Q: ARE THERE RULES? Is there some kind of formal rules that you have to follow for skating at a rink? What about outdoors? What's the usual way to pass or pace with someone?
A: Check here for some etiquette education.
 
Q: HOW DO I REGISTER FOR SKATING EVENTS?
A: Check each pages individual information page and follow the instructions on that page. Not all events are organized by the same person, so don't assume you will register the same way each time. Pay attention to deadlines.
 
Q: WHERE CAN I BUY MY OWN SKATES?
A: The best way is to order locally through a skating rink that sells roller skates. They will be able to give you the best information on what kind of skate will work the best for you depending on the type of skating, your size, weight and skating style, and price ranges. Also, if you should ever need help with maintenance or have questions about your skates, you can talk to someone locally and take your skates to them for help. However, there are many websites that sell skates and skate supplies as well.
 
Q: CAN I BUY SKATES ONLINE? WHAT DO I NEED TO KNOW?
A: Yes, a simple search for "roller skates" online will bring you to many companies that can sell you skates online. Although, we recommend that you take a trip to your local rink first to see if a skate you are interested is in their stock, or to at least try on a few boots to be sure of your skate size. Also, ordering through a rink ensures that all the maintenance and adjusting that needs done to a new set of skates is done by an expert. Make sure you are absolutely sure of your boot size (if you are a woman, check to see if they order in men's sizes only, and if so increase your shoe size by one). Always check the details of what you order to make sure you are getting the correct size parts that you might need for your skates. A great resource to learn more about skates and parts is www.skatelog.com.
 
Q: I DON'T SKATE RIGHT NOW, BUT I WANT TO LEARN SO I CAN PARTICIPATE... HOW DO I LEARN?
A: Other than just trial and error, and lots and lots of practice, you can find skating lessons at local roller rinks. There are also many videos online (search www.youtube.com for skating tips or skating lessons). Start with the essentials... how to stand up from sitting on the ground, and how to push off, and lastly how to stop (search for t-stop, slalom, and hockey stops).
 
Q: ARE THERE RINKS IN THE AREA WHERE I CAN SKATE TOO?
A: Our links page will (eventually) have a list of all the roller rinks we can locate in the Northeast Ohio area. Outside of that, try looking up rinks to travel to on the website www.quadskating.com/rinks/us/ 
 
Q: WHAT IS A QUAD?
A: You may be used to calling a skate a skate, but as you get more familiar with them, you will realize that there are many different types. Below is a glossary of terms that may help you feel a little more at ease when talking with one of us 'old timers'. For now, all you need to know is that a quad is the old school roller skate - basically any skate with four wheels in a square pattern.
 
Q: WHAT IS THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN A RECREATIONAL SKATE, A SPEED SKATE, AN ART SKATE, AND A HOCKEY SKATE?
A: That could actually take longer than you think to answer. So the short answer is that a speed skate is manufactured to be lighter, faster, more durable, and is usually higher quality and more expensive (depending on how serious of a speed skater you are). A speed skate usually has a lower profile on the leg/ankle and is more form fitted to a person's foot, sometimes being heat-molded or even cast. The plates are usually constructed of a lighter material to keep weight off of the foot for faster stepping. A recreational skate is made with either the outdoor skater or indoor skater in mind, and focuses on comfort and affordability and the wheels are a bit softer to handle the cracks and bumps that go with it. Art skates usually have a sturdier plate for jumps and are taller, lacing up a few inches past the ankle. Hockey skates (inline ones) LOOK similar to outdoor recreational inlines, but are sturdier and have a stronger plate and higher quality boot. The more often you skate, the better you will get at spotting the difference in looks.  
 
Q: IS THERE A DIFFERENCE BETWEEN OUTDOOR SKATES/SKATING AND INDOOR SKATES/SKATING?
A: Yes and no. It's almost the same, and you use the same basic form. Outdoors skating involves either long stretches of even pushes because you are skating on long trails or roads (unless you race in an outdoor speed circuit which may use a circular track). Indoors you will be skating in circles, so there is more crossing over. Inside you are on a smooth surface and outdoors you will have to worry about debris and skate on a much rougher surface (90% of the time). If you are not already experienced, you will want to use recreational skates outdoors with softer wheels to absorb some of the roughness of the roads and trails. If you use quad skates, then switch your wheels to a softer durometer, such as in the 60's or 70's. If you want to skate on inlines, again, lower the durometer of your wheels, but if you have 'recreational' inlines then they most likely came with outdoor wheels. Recreational inlines are VERY comfortable for outdoors. There is a lot of variety that is available. Just remember one important point... if you use wheels outdoors, do NOT continue to use them on indoor skating rink floors as they WILL pick up debris and miniscule specks of stuff that will essentially scratch up and damage a roller rink's floor. It's just good manners to keep indoor wheels exactly that... indoors. If you need any advice on skate setups for outdoors vs. indoors, first check out http://www.skatelogforum.com/forums/ and if you have more questions, feel free to email us!

Q: IS THERE A PLACE WHERE I CAN LEARN MORE ABOUT HOW TO ADJUST/MAINTAIN MY SKATES/BEARINGS/WHEELS/EQUIPMENT?
A: Yes! Many places! I am trying to gather some links and information for a new page within this site, but until then there are many places on the internet to find out more about maintaining your equipment. YouTube has many wonderful how-to videos (check out jamskateaddiction's youtube channel) as well as discussion boards with tons of input from experts all over the world (try http://www.skatelogforum.com/forums/)
 
 
GLOSSARY OF SOME TERMS ON THIS SITE FOR CLARIFICATION:
Flash-skate: A suddenly planned skating get-together where masses of skaters suddenly show up to skate together in a pack/group. The usual intention is to surprise people with a mass showing of skaters in hopes of getting more awareness of the sport out in the public eye, but it can also be the most spontaneous way to get "braggin rights". ;-)
 
Pack: Two or more skaters in a row that skate tightly together as a means of drafting off of each other. For longer distances, a pack leader may step aside at intervals to let someone else take the lead in order to draft off of them for a while. This saves energy overall for the group and decreases wind resistance for those in the back of the pack.
 
Quads: Roller skates with FOUR wheels in a box pattern, not inline. (Also some refer to this as 'old school'... but that is to be debated. lol)
 
Inlines: Any type of roller skate with all the wheels in one line, sometimes referred to by the brand name Rollerblade as this was a popular brand when they were originally mass-marketed.
 
Quad-lines: A skate with wheels in a quad pattern, using a specialized/modified plate to allow inline-type wheels (skinny and conical shaped) on it instead of the standard quad wheels.
 
Durometer: way to measure wheel's resilience (in skateboarding and in-line skating). Basically, a measure of the hardness and resilience of a plastic wheel.